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Tough enforcement of building codes critical to prevention of damage

August 22nd, 2012 Leave a comment Go to comments

A recent article by an insurance group discusses how important it is to enforce tough building codes. As an example, it uses Hurricane Andrew.  Insurance companies like tough enforcement because it saves the industry money.  On a more personal level, it decreases the amount of destruction done to people’s homes and property by major weather events.

Multiple studies have been conducted which demonstrate the positive impact of modern, engineering- based building codes on the performance of residential homes during a severe high-wind event. Among them are: an IBHS study conducted following Hurricane Charley (2004); it found that adoption and enforcement of modern building codes reduced the severity of residential property claims by 42% and the number of residential property claims by 60%; and,

•      a study commissioned by the National Association of Mutual Insurance Companies (NAMIC), which found that, if states in hurricane-prone areas had begun adopting and enforcing modern building codes in 1988, wind-related property losses could have been reduced by nearly $13 billion dollars.

Unfortunately, not all states have adopted minimum standards. The question is, why not?

 

 

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